You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Yell’ tag.

Directors share performances

We’ve analysed the share performance of all transactions commented on on this website.

That totals  comments on more than 100 company transactions, and over 350 transactions by individual directors, both executive and non exec, from November 2007 to February 2009.

If you had followed transactions by executive directors, where they were not accompanied by transactions by non execs, then the companies you would have bought or sold would have underperformed the market by 6%.

If you had followed transactions by non executive directors which were not accompanied by transactions by executive directors, then the shares you would have bought or sold would have outperformed the market by 9%.

These performance numbers relate to the share performance of the companies compared to the relevant index, and over the ‘holding period’, which may be from my comment to now, or earlier if I ‘closed’ the ‘view’.

The holding period amounts to very roughly 200 days, so these numbers are very significant on an annualised basis.

What about the number of directors transacting, does share performance have any correlation there?

Yes it does, a positive one. The greater the number of executive directors transacting at any time, the worse the performance. Conversely the greater the number of non execs, the better their performance.

I’ve weighted the share performance results with the number of directors transacting. The executive directors performance deteriorates by around a further 4 percentage points, and the non execs improves by a similar amount, calculated on a ‘per director’ basis.

Is this a suprise?

No, I suggested a divergence in performance of directors and non executive directors when I started this analysis 14 months ago.

Non execs have a much better understanding of the environment in which the company operates, and also of the valuation of the company shares, as they are able to ‘stand back’ and better analyse the environment.

Executive director share signals are clouded by disposals for tax, or buying shares to qualify for the incentive scheme. But they also have their noses to the grindstone, and therefore are less able to observe what is happening around them, to both their firms competitive position but also to stock market perceptions of their company’s shares.

This might also explain why so many executive directors bought into what they thought were cheap bank shares over the last 12 months. See Nils Pratleys article ‘Bankers lead way through the trap door’, which discusses this blinkered approach, and gives LTCM, Barclays and Yell as examples.

Is this a common phenomenon, or just apparent in bear markets. I don’t know. Most commentators, researchers, experts point to those with the most information, the CEOs, CFOs, making the best decisions. It may be that in recessions and bear markets, the individuals with a greater awareness are the non execs not the executive directors.

Time will tell.

If you require any further information, or would like to discuss these findings, please email me at followthedirectors@gmail.com, and I’ll get back to you.

If you manage institutional equities or hedge funds, then I am happy to provide a service analysing your equity portfolio on a regular basis.

Regards

Simon Winfield

http://followthedirectors.co.uk

followthedirectors@gmail.com

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine

I want to wish you ‘good investing’ in a period of huge uncertainty. I suppose (is ‘hope’ a more appropriate word) the brave will be there to buy when everybody is panicking, which is why I’ve allowed myself to have a list of buys.

When I look at directors dealings I’m looking for a change of pattern or direction, an intensity of director interest indicated by volume and speed, and a sentiment change within a sector.

Stocks that satisfy one or more of these criteria are

  • Wolfson (WLF)
  • Aegis (AGS)
  • Findel (FDL)
  • Enodis (ENO)
  • Segro (SGRO)
  • Hammerson (HMSO)
  • Great Portland (GPOR)
  • Yell (YELL)
  • Michael Page (MPI)

Look in the archives or via the tag list for my reasoning on these stocks.

Real estate stocks are overweighted here, which I suppose shows a tendency to ‘value’, by me and company directors. If I look at the real estate sector overall though, I find that over the last month director buys outnumber sells by about 4:1 (source www.digitallook.com). Interestingly the bank directors seem to have gone a little quiet recently, after a flurry in early November (see RBS) !!

You’ll also notice a preponderence to midcap or ftse250 stocks in this list. This is not intended, but a result of the criteria. I don’t look at stocks smaller than the ftse 250.

CEO and CFO of Yell (YELL) yesterday bought over £1m of shares between them. Non exec Bunting also picked up about £620k’s worth at the same level (415-416p).

Apart from the fact that this is serious $$ to invest, another reason for picking up on this signal is the fact that Condron and Davis sold stock (around £7m between them) back in December 2006 at around 570p. This was followed by a profit warning in April which precipitated a 17% fall in the share price as a result of analysts downgrading US growth forecasts.

Maybe there is now good news in the pipeline. Look for positive comments on Yell.com over the next three months.

yell

Add to Technorati Favorites

Prefer to get emails? Click here

RSS Find us on twitter.com/directorsdeals

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

twitter

September 2020
M T W T F S S
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

twitter